When Testing Requires Throwing the Computer Out The Window

OK, so maybe not exactly throwing your computer out the window, but I recently saw a post on LinkedIn (here) that got me thinking about how I sometimes think and feel about testing software. The image is posted below, and we’ll do two things. First I’ll describe how I relate testing to this image. Secondly, I wanna hear you caption this photo in the comments.

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Throwing Your Computer Out the Window

There are a few times a week that I want to throw my computer out the window. This can be for a handful of reasons.

Literally

Sometimes it gets late in the day and a bug is still crawling around your fingertips that you just cannot catch. You know you saw it, you know that it’s a bug, and that by catching it, you might get some immediate or long term recognition for it, but you just can’t seem to reproduce it. Every time you try, there is nothing wrong, everything works, but you know what the reproducing steps are, it just won’t happen this time.

I get the same feeling anytime I have a bug that I am able repro time and again, and then I call the developer over to show them and I can’t do it. The ole “works on my machine” or “nothing ever goes wrong when you’re here, can you just stand here”. It drives me nuts when I cannot repro a bug in front of the developer.

Lastly, anytime I log in to test, and it’s just a bad day for bugs. It happens, there are days that are inevitably buggy, and I can’t get through the workflow without a bug blocking me. Then when fixed, it causes more and more bugs. This repeats itself all day until the end, when you realize how little you accomplished today, because every time you went in to test, there was a bug blocking you.

Metaphorically

So maybe throwing the computer out the window isn’t the greatest test step in my test plan, but I say it to describe an example of testing and then losing power, or connection to the internet, or your computer just decides to blue screen. These aren’t really scenarios we test, maybe ever, but it’s always something to keep in mind when testing. What if I’m right in the middle of something and the site crashes or an unexpected error occurs. Do I have to start all over from the beginning? Did the site save any of my progress? Maybe a good alternative is to break up the workflow into segments that save on each step. This might prevent a large amount of data to be lost.

This could happen more on mobile devices when transferring between networks as you walk in and out of buildings and connect to WiFi. I wrote about this testing scenario on Mobile Testing Limitations on a Desktop Computer.

Caption Time

If you don’t have a LinkedIn account, there would be no way for you see the comments on the photo. But some of the good ones were “Troubleshooting Windows” or “Windows just crashed again”, and even “Jim put his computer to sleep”. I want to hear if you have anything better? Comment below!

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